Getting ready for an outdoor run always seems to be a wonderful idea in theory.  You lace up your shoes, your playlist is ready and you feel all pumped-up, well, for probably like half a mile And then you’ll notice how thirsty you’re getting, how hot the weather is, how your feet hurts, and how it’s really getting harder to breathe right. Oh, how do you make it STOP?

Yes, for tons of people, running can feel like hell, but hey, it seems that there’s still a silver lining for those who WANT to really enjoy running, and not just the idea of it.  Going for a run doesn’t really have to suck each time. Sure, it can’t always be mind-blowingly fun, but there are things you can do to make it a bit enjoyable.

  • Thing chafing doesn’t have to happen each time you run (or, at all!).

This might be one of the worst things about running, but it doesn’t have to own you because thankfully, there are ways to make sure it doesn’t happen to you.  Normally, skin contact happens when you’re running in your shorts, but if you don’t want to part with your fave shorts, make sure that at least you apply a moisturizing balm on your thighs to create a moisture barrier in your skin which reduces friction that leads to chafing.  If you don’t have a moisturizing balm, rubbing some deodorant on your inner thighs should do the trick too.

  • Prevent the occurrence of blisters by wearing the right socks (and shoes, of course).

Blisters happen when there’s excessive friction happening between your socks and shoes against your toes. Having foot abnormalities, wearing ill-fitting shoes, the heat and running at a faster pace can all up to your chances of getting blisters.  To prevent this, use non-cotton, synthetic socks, use a moisturizing balm in between your toes and make sure to gear up with the right shoes.

  • Learn to take control of how you breathe.

If after a few minutes you find yourself already huffing and puffing, the simple solution is maybe to run a bit more.  That feeling of like having your lungs burning is a sign that you’re pushing your body too hard. Ideally, your breathing should be under control unless you’re doing sprints or running in an incline. Meaning, if you’re struggling for air on a relatively steady run, it’s best to wind down or do a walking break.  You might also experience a sudden side twitch that can be annoying as hell during one of your running stints, and when it happens, try doing some slow, deep exhales from the diaphragm to help alleviate the pain.

  • Get motivated with a kick-ass playlist.

At times, running can get really boring, especially those long, endurance training runs. You’re go-to fix? Try mixing up your running route so you’re not going through the same path over and over again.  Also having a good playlist to jam to is a must.  Or to join a community run perhaps? After all that’s a great way to meet people with roughly the same interests as yours and provide you with new motivations.

  • Shin splints can be very common but you can do something to take care of them easily.

Pain in the shin can be bothersome and can put a dour note on that runner high that you’re after.  When experiencing shin pain, doctors recommend runners to do shorter strides and paying attention to one’s cadence.  If you’re not moving your feet quick enough, you’ll end up spending more time on the ground which can put more pressure into the lower legs. Though this can help alleviate the shin pain, still the best way to deal with it is via prevention.  Increasing one’s mileage in a safe manner is a good way to start, plus ensuring that you’re wearing the right pair of shoes.  Don’t forget to stretch before running, and if all else fails; consult a doctor for proper diagnosis of your pain.

  • Stay hydrated.

If you have done your research even before running, then this one’s already a no-brainer. Drink water to replenish all those electrolytes you’ve lost while running.

Facebook Comments