Reasons for a Stomachache After Eating Vegetables

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Everyone knows that vegetables are healthy, and that’s why eating them should yield nothing but tons of health benefits such as reduced risk of constipation, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

Unfortunately, eating vegetables can afterwards cause a stomachache in some people or certain situations.

If you’re one of those who tend to shy away from vegetables for fear of having an achy belly afterwards, don’t stop reading now because this article will tell you some of the reasons why.

Got health-conscious family members and friends who wish to add lots of servings of vegetables to their everyday diet but they can’t because of frequent stomachaches? Then make sure that you repost this article later on so that they, too, may be able to check out the following reasons for a stomachache after eating vegetables:

Too Much Fiber

We all know that vegetables are some of the most fiber-rich foods on the face of the planet. It’s no secret that fiber is especially good for the gut as it facilitates the removal of unwanted digestive byproducts as well as poisonous substances from the gastrointestinal or GI tract.

Unfortunately, too much fiber can cause digestive distress. This is most especially true if someone who is not used to a high-fiber diet suddenly consumes lots and lots of vegetables.

No matter if you are suffering from constipation or you just want to keep it from striking, refrain from having tons of vegetables all at once in order for you to reap the benefits of fiber and at the same time fend off the unfavorable things that too much of this indigestible type of carbohydrate can bring.

Eating Them Uncooked

Just like what’s mentioned above, fiber is a type of carbohydrate that the digestive enzymes cannot break down. Aside from eating plenty of vegetables per meal, consuming vegetables raw can also cause stomachache in some people.

According to experts, raw vegetables contain a type of fiber called cellulose, and it’s the one that makes up the walls of the cells of vegetables. Cellulose can be very tough, and that is why it’s not unlikely for you to experience a painful tummy after consuming lots of raw vegetables.

Needless to say, it is a good idea for someone who tends to encounter a stomachache after consuming salad to opt for cooked vegetables instead in order to break down cellulose and also make nutrients in vegetables more accessible.

IBS

Short for irritable bowel syndrome, IBS is a digestive issue that affects the large intestines. People who suffer from IBS should avoid certain foods, unless they are willing to experience all kinds of symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating excess gas, and diarrhea or constipation.

A diet that’s high in FODMAPs — fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols — can caused IBS symptoms to strike, and experts say that certain vegetables contain lots of FODMAPs. Some examples of them are asparagus, artichokes, bell peppers, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, green beans, cucumbers, garlic, lettuce, onions, tomatoes and zucchinis.

Needless to say, it is a good idea for anyone to steer clear of a high-FODMAP diet in order to keep the various unfavorable symptoms of IBS to come into being.

Bad Preparation

Sometimes it is what’s added to vegetables that can cause a stomachache to show up. For instance, too much salt can cause bloating, and it’s something that can definitely make the belly feel achy.

In some instances, a stomachache can be blamed on the consumption of vegetables contaminated with bacteria that can cause food poisoning. It’s because of this why thoroughly washing or cooking vegetables beforehand is highly recommended.

Speaking of cooking, some vegetables are best eaten thoroughly cooked. For instance, beans are known to cause excess gas formation — and when there’s too much gas, there’s also abdominal pain. Gas-forming vegetables such as beans and cruciferous ones should be cooked and also chewed very well in order to keep a stomachache at bay.

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