Different muscle groups cooperate with other muscle groups when our body goes about its everyday routines. We depend on these muscle groups every single day. One of these groups can be found in our forearms. We use them in everyday activities as well as when we work out.

Stronger forearms (forward bones of the upper extremities and wrists) means more support for the upper arms and biceps when lifting. Weak forearms won’t allow you to carry the weight you could have with strong biceps and shoulders.

Forearm Anatomy

Flexors and extensors make the forearm muscles move. They make your wrists, and your grip stronger. You can see evidence in this when your lift things every day.

You can find a lot of muscles, both short and long in the forearms such as flexors, extensors, supinators and pronators. They all make the hands andwrists move.

The five best exercises for strengthening the forearms

There are many exercises for strengthening your forearms. Here are the top five. These exercises are efficient and effective, focusing on as little movement, but maximizing concentration.

1. Barbell Wrist Curl

This targets the flexors of the forearms. You can use either a machine or a barbell for this.

First, sit of a bench, or the machine. Place your forearms on your things with your palms facing up while holding the weights. With only your wrists and hands, try curling the weights up as high as possible.

As you bring the weights down, allow the bar to roll into the inside of the fingertips.

2. Reverse Barbell Wrist Curl

This is a lot like the first exercise, but it involves more of the extensors this time around.

Get into the same position as the first exercise. The difference this time is instead of your palms facing up, they should be facing down. With the muscles of your forearms and wrists, try curling the barbell up as high as possible. Don’t lift your arms from your thighs. Control the downward motion as well.

3. Dumbbell Wrist Curls

Here we have another great forearm routine for the flexors. Because you’re using dumbbells, you can focus on each forearm individually, and feel more balanced.

Straddle the bench with your legs spread. Place your forearm on the bench. Make sure it extends out of the end of the bench. Also make sure your holding the weights with an underhand grip before flexing the wrist so the weight goes up. Let it roll back down to your fingertip. Repeat that motion.

4. Reverse Dumbbell Wrist Curls

These exercise look very much alike, but a small change position creates a major change in which muscle is targeted. While the previous exercise worked the flexors, this works the extensors. Redundancy will never be a problem.

Go into the same position on top of the bench as the previous exercise, but with your palm faced down. Lower the dumbbell as low as possible before bringing it back up as you flex the wrist.

5. Reverse Barbell Curls

This exercise is different from the previous ones because a bit of the bicep is being used. But during the movement, forearm extensors are actually targeted as well. It’s great since you’re combining moves and taking a bit of load off the forearms.

Get a barbell (or an EZ curl barbell). Make sure your hands and shoulder-width apart with your palms facing the floor. You should be performing the overhand grip. Stand straight. Make sure your back is flat and your chin is up. Keep your elbows to your sides and lift eh barbell up to your neck area. Try holding it there and flexing the forearms before lowering the barbell in a controlled manner.

It’s very important that your arms are at your sides. If your arms open up, you’re making your upper arms do work and you may strain your shoulders.

Here are some workout sets

For beginners:

Two sets of barbell wrist curls with twelve repetitions for each set. Two sets of reverse dumbbell wrist curls with twelve repetitions for each set.

For intermediate lifters:

Three sets of reverse barbell curls with ten repetitions for each set. Two sets of dumbbell wrist curls with twelve repetitions for each set. A set of reverse barbell wrist curls with fifteen repetitions for each set.

For advanced lifters:

A set of reverse barbell wrist curls with twenty repetitions for each set. Three sets of reverse barbell curls with ten repetitions for each set. Two sets of dumbbell wrist curls with twelve repetitions for each set. Two sets of barbell wrist curls with twelve repetitions for each set. A set of reverse dumbbell wrist curls with twenty repetitions for each set.
To maximize your gains, do any of these exercises alongside your usual workout regimen. Some individuals want to mix these in after training their back and biceps. But since they need a lot of strength to grip for training, we recommend that you don’t train your forearms a day before or after back and biceps routines.

Make sure to space your forearm workouts nicely in your schedule so they have enough time for recovery. Consume healthy food with a lot of protein to shorten the recovery period.

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