It’s alarming to know that only one fourth of the whole female population has taken the time to look and examine their lady parts. It is quite understandable really. It is a bit difficult to see down there. Guys have it a lot easier. Not only does it take a bit of yoga or a mirror to see everything, most of our important parts are internal and can’t really see what’s going on. However, this doesn’t really excuse us from learning about our female anatomy. Studies have proven that women that have a positive understanding of their genitals are more prone to orgasm, more open in bed and comfortable in their skin. Allow us to start your curiosity with this simple female anatomy guide. Scroll down to find out more about your private area.

Identifying the Parts

If we were to show you a diagram of the female anatomy – can you correctly identify each part? If you can, then good for you! A recent social experiment showed that most men and women are not able to identify parts of the female anatomy, even ones that are external. The social experiment also showed that women are more capable of identifying the male reproductive area. This can be incredibly troublesome as women. Most women are not even aware that the vagina is not the whole genital area, but only part of it. The best thing you can do to understand your anatomy is to take a look in the mirror. Look at a picture with labels and try to identify them to your own. Identify the vulva, clitoris, the vagina and so on. Other internal parts such as the uterus and Fallopian tubes are also important and will be discussed in a different article.

Labia Majora

The labia majora is the outer lips of the female genital area. This consists of the two folds of skin and the pubic mound. This is created to help protect the vagina and clitoris. This part mostly contains fatty tissue, making it less sensitive than other areas. If you wax, you will notice that the skin nearer the vagina is more sensitive. A sub area of this is the labia minora. This is the inner lips or skin that you find when you spread apart the labia majora. This area is hairless and a lot thinner. The labia minora consist of secreting glands and nerve endings. The glands appear like tiny bumps; these glands help with lubrication to help separate the skin for easier intercourse.

Bartholin Glands

This is the microscopic part of your anatomy. It can help with lubrication like the labia minora. These are invisible to the naked eye. These releases moisture on the outer vaginal canal. They typically release little amounts of moisture. So, foreplay is incredibly important for easier penetration.

Clitoris

This is the small pink nub near the pubic mound and can vary in size. This is mostly created for sexual pleasure. The clitoris has approximately 8 thousand nerve endings. This is the area you need to understand the most if you want to improve sexual pleasure. The other important thing for you and your partner to identify is the G-spot (a spongy area located near the upper wall of the vagina).

Appearance

If you have ever felt worried about how different your genital area looks — don’t! We do not have as much sources or images of vaginas besides the ones we see in x rated videos or for medical purposes; but a thing that most doctors will tell you no genital area looks the same. Some people may have thicker labia majora and some can have darker skin around their pubic mound – and all of this is normal.

Smell

A lot of women worry that their private area doesn’t smell nice, but in truth the private area is not supposed to smell like roses. People have been using douches and scented feminine wash to remove the odor, but the natural musky smell of this area is completely normal – and is even attractive to the opposite sex. However, a fishy or rotten smell can be a symptom of infection.

We hope that this simple, yet incomplete guide was able to help you understand your genitals and how it works, at least it has helped you become more curious about it. If you have further questions about your female anatomy there are a lot of sources you can use to study for it. If you prefer, you can ask your medical professional about it.

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